CONFEDERATE GOLD

Whether it was squirreled away for the day that the South would rise again, or simply hidden so that the Union soldiers would not get their hands on it, the fact remains there is a fortune in missing confederate gold that disappeared near the end and at the end of the Civil War.

Much of the Confederate Gold was said to have disappeared from Georgia. It was a hub of minting, trading and gold mining before it fell to Union forces. Several banks had money gone missing at about that same time. Some of the treasures reported to be buried in light of Union overtaking were:

$30 Million buried outside of Savannah, Georgia. The gold was stamped Confederate States of America Treasury and was originally from Texas and being sent to England and France for safekeeping. The rumor is that the gold was buried under the name of a confederate general between two false generals in a cemetery. Some rumors of the same story say the money had been moved to a depository in Atlanta.

Confederate Gold in the form of bullion in the amount of $500,000 is said to be located in West Central Broward County. It was allegedly buried by Captain John Riley. He planned to have it shipped to Cuba but was being pursued by Union soldiers.

In Georgia some lost Confederate gold worth about $100,000 back in 1865 went missing. Two wagon trains filled with gold were robbed at Chennault Crossroads in Lincoln County. The mystery seems to be centered on the Chennault family and plantation. The Chennault family was even sent to D.C. to be interrogated as to the where about of the money. Initially, the money was to be sent to England, and it was assured by Jefferson Davis that the money would be returned to the South regardless of the outcome of the war. There are different theories as to what happened to that gold. Apparently it never did leave the country. Oddly enough, along the road to the Chennault Plantation, many gold coins have been found after heavy rains.